Ven Senor Jesus (Come Lord Jesus)



The most remarkable claim of Christianity is that God has come into the world.   It is remarkable because most of us, at times, have  felt like orphans. It is the answer we want to hear, that God does indeed love us  .... if we can only accept it.
    
But we live in an age of skepticism.  Many in science (which  itself is neutral on question of God) prefer theories, excluding any hint of a divine explanation.  Is this even reasonable, when we are talking about cosmology? Yet this doubt pervades our whole culture, casting shadows over all of us. 

Even the saints have experienced the dark night.

St. Anselm, a Benedictine monk and scholar, writes:
"If You are everywhere, why do I not see Your presence? Truly You dwell in unapproachable light. But where is the unapproachable light, or how shall I come to it? Or who shall lead me to that light and into it, that I may see you in it? Again, by what signs, under what form, shall I seek you? I have never seen you, O Lord, my God; I do not know your face."(1)

God is beyond all knowing, the unapproachable light.  He exists on His own terms beyond this world.  The Buddhists describe  the transcendent Unknown, as Nirvana, which defies all words.   Jews and Christians say that no one has seen the face of God.

Anselm concludes his meditation:
"For I cannot seek You unless you show me, nor find You unless You reveal Yourself." 

The meaning of this season is simply:  the Unknown has made Himself known, both in the birth at Bethlehem and, if we let Him, in our own lives.  

Ven, Senor Jesus.   Amen. (2)    


Notes:  (1)  From the Proslogion by St. Anselm.
    (2)  "Ven Senor Jesus", which echoes the Aramaic 'Marantha' or "Come, our Lord" in the Scriptures is also a song by Hermana (Sister) Glenda in Spanish.   Click the link above or in Quick Links, on left, to listen on You Tube.

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