Build My Church: Renovating a Building and Transforming Souls


The Renovation of San Fernando Rey
in Omoa, Honduras

When St Francis heard God`s call to rebuild his church, he began with stone and mortar.  But he and the brothers soon discovered that  physical efforts were restorative spiritually as well.

In a similar fashion, when Ana Reid, SAMS missionary and also a member of my church, Christ the Redeemer in Massachusetts,  was asked by Bishop Allen to support the work of Church of San Fernando Rey in Omoa, she started with a church renovation.

The part-time, overworked priest-in-charge had neglected this church, both with regard to the people and the building.  The church held only one eight o`clock service on Sunday and nothing else during the week. The building itself leaked every time it rained, was dirty and the electricity didn`t work.
Ana started her work at Omoa by bringing people together for a church clean-up.  She also invited me to do an architectural assesment of the building. We decided immediately that the priorities were to repair the roof and paint the building

American High School Student
Working with Honduran Roofer

When the roof replacement began, we had the help of Father Wes Wubbenhorst of the Diocese of Maryland and a group of high school students, who came for a week of hard work under the tropical sun.  In spite of the language barriers, the mission group, the San Fernando Rey parish and the professional roofers worked together installing a new roof of traditional clay tiles and prepping the church for painting.

The transformation, which has occurred in hearts of the church members, is a renewed sense of purpose and hope.  Someone finally cares. When I visited parishioners with Ana, I sensed their excitement and a desire to participate in the new plans for the church.   

Of course, that hope comes from more than just a new building.   It comes from all the effort Ana has put in, teaching parenting classes, Bible studies and leading church services on Sunday.  

It also comes the hardworking North American teenagers, who cared enough to spend a week working side by side with the church members under the tropical sun.  


Honduran Church Members and American Volunteers
Cleaning Ceramic Roof Tiles

The transformation, which has occurred in hearts of the church members, is a renewed sense of purpose and hope.  Someone finally cares. When I visited parishioners with Ana, I sensed their excitement and a desire to participate in the new plans for the church.   

Of course, that hope comes from more than just a new building.   It comes from all the effort Ana has put in, teaching parenting classes, Bible studies and leading church services on Sunday.  

It also comes the hardworking North American teenagers, who cared enough to spend a week working side by side with the church members under the tropical sun.  



American Music Students

Teach Honduran Children the Recorder

This project, whose purpose is to introduce music to children in
poor communities, will pay a Honduran music teacher to continue
teaching the children.  After three days of lessons, the children
were ready for their first performance during the Sunday service:
'Hot Cross Buns'. 

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Christmas Party at Cerro de Hula

Mission 2016

Santa Maria de los Angeles Project